Burning Your Neighbor’s Field

Burning Your Neighbor’s Field

Boundaries are healthy. We all have a plot of ground in which God is planting us, and growing a field of grace which forms our contribution to the greater “land” of God’s people. If we fail to respect those boundaries, we violate our brother’s “field”. Learn how the rulings of the sages in the Talmud concerning these laws in the Torah can affect our view of our ministry and the responsibilities we have regarding it.

(Audio) Mediator of the Covenant

(Audio) Mediator of the Covenant

What is the role of Torah in the life of a Gentile? Is there a precedent to Gentiles receiving Torah obligation? Why does God use the agent of a mediator in the establishment of the covenant at Sinai, and how does this relate to the ministry of the Messiah? Finally, what is the difference between irrational fear vs. the fear of the LORD?

 

Purchasing Buried Treasure, Part Three

Purchasing Buried Treasure, Part Three

It is written, “For you (the people of Israel) shall be a desirable land, says G‑d” (Malachi 3:12). Just as the greatest explorers will never uncover the limits of the great and valuable resources which the Almighty has placed within the earth, neither will anyone ever discover the limits of the great treasures which lie buried within a Jew – G‑d’s “desirable land.”              – Bal Shem Tov

In our third and final installment of our analysis of the Master’s parable of the buried treasure (Matt.13:44), we will try to bring light to bear upon another interesting aspect in the passage.

In part one, we considered the debate in the Gemara concerning the dispute of claimed property.  In that, we saw that merely “seeing” something, while certainly implying that one “found” it, does not mean that one thereby has legal possession.  This must be established by more than just an oath.  Through the man purchasing the field, we deduced that the Master is teaching us that it is not enough to merely “discover” a hidden treasure (the kingdom of God), but that we must secure it through making it our own.

In part two, we realized a deeper picture within the parable, considering Talmudic discussions of ownership and theft, and realized that the man is the Messiah, the field is the claim of the enemy upon his inheritance, the treasure is the Lord’s inheritance, and that he “purchases” us even though the Father has already given us to him as an inheritance, because he must prevent the enemy from staking a competing claim against his own, since we live in the enemy’s “field”.

Now, with this new line of reasoning in tow, we will look at the Hebrew concepts behind the parable in relation to betrothal and marriage. Continue reading